Blacks Must Confront Reality

Walter  Williams
via: Jewish World Review
By Walter Williams
Published August 27, 2014

 Blacks Must Confront RealityThough racial discrimination exists, it is nowhere near the barrier it once was. The relevant question is: How much of what we see today can be explained by racial discrimination? This is an important question because if we conclude that racial discrimination is the major cause of black problems when it isn’t, then effective solutions will be elusive forever. To begin to get a handle on the answer, let’s pull up a few historical facts about black Americans.In 1950, female-headed households were 18 percent of the black population. Today it’s close to 70 percent. One study of 19th-century slave families found that in up to three-fourths of the families, all the children lived with the biological mother and father. In 1925 New York City, 85 percent of black households were two-parent households. Herbert Gutman, author of “The Black Family in Slavery and Freedom, 1750-1925,” reports, “Five in six children under the age of six lived with both parents.” Also, both during slavery and as late as 1920, a teenage girl raising a child without a man present was rare among blacks. Continue reading

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Do Blacks Need Favors?

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / July 23, 2014

Earlier this month, the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act was celebrated. During the act’s legislative debate, then-Sen. Hubert Humphrey, responding to predictions, promised, “I’ll eat my hat if this leads to racial quotas.” I don’t know whether Humphrey got around to keeping his promise, but here’s my question: Is it within the capacity of black Americans to make it in this society without the special favors variously called racial preferences, quotas, affirmative action and race-sensitive policies? What might a “yes” answer to that question assume and imply about blacks? Likewise, what would a “no” answer assume and imply? Let’s look at it. Continue reading

Absurdity, brazenness and hypocrisy reigns

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / January 27, 1999, during the Clinton administration, but the message is still valid today!

(JWR) —-(http://www.jewishworldreview.com) A YEAR’S WORTH OF PRESIDENTIAL SCANDAL proves at least two things about us: our weakened ability to think and political hypocrisy.

The president’s defenders and pundits constantly preach that removing Clinton from office will “overturn the 1996 elections.” I’m wondering whether they want Americans to believe, and whether Americans actually believe, that removing Clinton from office means that Bob Dole and Jack Kemp, defeated in the 1996 presidential elections, will assume the presidency and vice presidency. It doesn’t. Continue reading

Economics 101

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / January 20, 1999, but the message is still valid today!

(JWR) —- (http://www.jewishworldreview.com) MOST PEOPLE THINK THAT ECONOMICS IS DIFFICULT, but it’s really simple. More than anything else, economics is a way of thinking. Knowing just a little bit of economics can save us from the tricks of political hustlers.

At the heart of economics are a few simple and easy-to-comprehend rules — it’s not rocket science. Our first rule is there’s a cost to everything. To obtain more of one thing requires the sacrifice of something else. Nothing is free. Continue reading

A wrongful celebration

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / January 13, 1999, but the message is still valid today!

(JWR) —- (http://www.jewishworldreview.com) SCARCELY A DAY GOES BY without a reference to preparations for the new millennium.

First, what’s a millennium, anyway? A millennium is a period of 1,000 years. Does the next millennium start at the beginning of next year (2000) at the stroke of midnight? Most people think it does, and they’re wrong.

Here’s how to think about when the new — third — millennium starts. Continue reading

Economics of predation

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / January 6, 1999, but the message still applies today!

(JWR) —- (http://www.jewishworldreview.com) DONALD BOUDREAUX, director of the Foundation for Economic Education in Irvington-on-Hudson, N.Y., and John T. Wenders, professor of economics at the University of Idaho, wrote articles about predation in the September 1998 issue and December 1988 issue of the Washington, D.C.,-based Competitive Enterprise Institute’s monthly “Update.” Continue reading

Things I wonder about

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / December 30, 1998, but the message still applies today!

(JWR) —- (http://www.jewishworldreview.com) THERE ARE THINGS THAT REALLY PUZZLE ME. For example, some insurers advertise bargain life-insurance rates provided you don’t have a life-shortening lifestyle. Being a non-smoker is one of them.

That’s actuarially sound policy because smokers risk a shorter life expectancy; but insurance companies don’t advertise lower rates to non-homosexuals. After all homosexuals, as a group — because of AIDS — have a shorter life expectancy than either smokers or heterosexuals. You say, “That would be discrimination against homosexuals!” But my question is why is it acceptable for insurance companies to discriminate against smokers but not homosexuals? Continue reading

Tragedy in black neighborhoods

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / November 20, 1998, but the message still applies today!

THE LEARNING CHANNEL and Discovery Channel both feature shows about medical trauma centers around the United States. Many trauma patients suffer from gunshot and stabbing wounds. Some of them are gang-bangers, but quite a few are innocent victims of drive-by shootings or stray bullets through walls or windows.

Doctors and social workers are shown consoling grieving friends and family members, sometimes having to tell them their loved one died, or is brain dead, or will never walk again. Continue reading

Where are the poor?

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / October 28, 1998, but the message still applies today!

THE CENSUS BUREAU reports 36.5 million poor Americans in 1998, nearly 14 percent of our population.

Both historically and globally, poverty has meant living in destitution, something akin to what we see in India, Romania and Mexico. For our country, only a tiny fraction of the population shares anywhere near such a fate. Continue reading