Economics of predation

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / January 6, 1999, but the message still applies today!

(JWR) —- (http://www.jewishworldreview.com) DONALD BOUDREAUX, director of the Foundation for Economic Education in Irvington-on-Hudson, N.Y., and John T. Wenders, professor of economics at the University of Idaho, wrote articles about predation in the September 1998 issue and December 1988 issue of the Washington, D.C.,-based Competitive Enterprise Institute’s monthly “Update.” Continue reading

Things I wonder about

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / December 30, 1998, but the message still applies today!

(JWR) —- (http://www.jewishworldreview.com) THERE ARE THINGS THAT REALLY PUZZLE ME. For example, some insurers advertise bargain life-insurance rates provided you don’t have a life-shortening lifestyle. Being a non-smoker is one of them.

That’s actuarially sound policy because smokers risk a shorter life expectancy; but insurance companies don’t advertise lower rates to non-homosexuals. After all homosexuals, as a group — because of AIDS — have a shorter life expectancy than either smokers or heterosexuals. You say, “That would be discrimination against homosexuals!” But my question is why is it acceptable for insurance companies to discriminate against smokers but not homosexuals? Continue reading

Unseen crime costs

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / December 23, 1998, but the message still applies today!

(JWR) —- (http://www.jewishworldreview.com) CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR HURTS in ways seldom appreciated and understood, and the level of crime in black communities has consequences far more devastating than the racism our ancestors experienced.

Not only does crime reduce upward mobility, it reduces the value of anything in the community and turns whole neighborhoods into economic wastelands. Let’s look at a very minor example that captures the essence of some of the unappreciated effects of criminal behavior — the case of supermarkets. Continue reading

How to become rich

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / December 21, 1998, but the message still applies today!

LET’S DEFINE BEING RICH as having a million dollars of net worth. To become a millionaire, according to Professors Richard McKenzie of the University of California-Irvine and Dwight Lee of the University of Georgia, is almost a cakewalk.

In their August/September Futurist article, “How Almost Anyone Can Become a Millionaire,” McKenzie and Lee write, “Most people in America got rich because they chose to do so, and they pursued a path to wealth that is wide open to most of the rest of us.” In other words, becoming rich is a matter of choice. Let’s look at it. Continue reading

Advancing national decadence

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / December 9, 1998, but the message still applies today!

DEMOCRATS WERE RIGHT in their claim that the House Judiciary Committee hearings haven’t revealed anything new about Clinton’s conduct in office.

What the hearings have revealed is the advanced cancerous stage of American moral decadence. Let’s look at it.

Continue reading

White Privilege

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / Review May 28, 2014

JewishWorldReview.com | What would you think if your 8-year-old came home and told you that “white privilege is something that white people have, meaning they have an advantage in a lot of things and they can get a job more easily”? You would have heard that at the recent 15th annual White Privilege Conference in Madison, Wisconsin, attended by 2,500 public-school teachers, administrators and students from across the nation. Continue reading

The Civil War wasn’t about slavery

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / December 2, 1998, but the message still applies today!

THE PROBLEMS THAT LED TO THE CIVIL WAR are the same problems today —- big, intrusive government. The reason we don’t face the specter of another Civil War is because today’s Americans don’t have yesteryear’s spirit of liberty and constitutional respect, and political statesmanship is in short supply. Continue reading

What’s happened to us?

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / November 24, 1998, but the message still applies today!

THE SCANDALS SURROUNDING the Clinton White House, and the public’s response to them, is symptomatic of a problem far more devastating than a president committing perjury and obstruction.

We’ve had presidents, such as Warren Harding and Richard Nixon, who disgraced their office and our basic institutions survived. But this is the first time in our history we’ve had a president disgrace his office and receive widespread political and public support while doing so. Continue reading

Tragedy in black neighborhoods

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / November 20, 1998, but the message still applies today!

THE LEARNING CHANNEL and Discovery Channel both feature shows about medical trauma centers around the United States. Many trauma patients suffer from gunshot and stabbing wounds. Some of them are gang-bangers, but quite a few are innocent victims of drive-by shootings or stray bullets through walls or windows.

Doctors and social workers are shown consoling grieving friends and family members, sometimes having to tell them their loved one died, or is brain dead, or will never walk again. Continue reading

Family debasement

via: Jewish World Review This was originally published on Jewish World Review / November 11, 1998, but the message still applies today!

GOOD ECONOMISTS ALWAYS ASK whether the benefits of a social policy outweigh its costs, and are there negative unintended consequences. Let’s ask this question about Social Security, keeping in the back of our minds the biblical admonition, “Honor thy mother and father, as the Lord thy God commanded.”

Dr. Jennifer Roback, a research fellow at the Stanford University-based Hoover Institution, penned an excellent article in the Oct. 5 Forbes Magazine titled, “Chopping the Family Tree.” The article gives us some hints why parents are not honored as they were in the past. My summarization is simple: We don’t honor our parents because, through the tax code, we can get somebody else to honor them. That might be a bit too cynical, so let’s look at Roback’s analysis. Continue reading